Tag Archive | Halloween

DO-IT-YOURSELF CANDY CORN WREATH

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Found this cute idea on the HGTV site. Very bright welcome for your little goblin visitors.

Create a festive Halloween wreath for under $5. 

Credit & Courtesy of  Sarah Saucedo  http://thriftydecorchick.blogspot.com/

Materials Needed:

  • candy corn
  • foam wreath
  • black tape (alternatives: paper streamers, ribbon or fabric)
  • hot glue gun

Wrap Wreath With Tape

Begin by wrapping the foam wreath with the black crepe paper (you can also use paper streamers, ribbon or fabric).

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Establish Spacing

For the first row, lay the candies out to check spacing, and then glue them in place with the glue gun.

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Glue, Glue, Glue

Continue to glue the candy corn onto the wreath until it is completely covered. The front can have as many as a few layers of candies while the sides will only have one. Hang the completed wreath from using the crepe paper.

 

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DIY SPARKLY PUMPKINS

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Here is what you will need.

-Elmer’s glue
-Epsom salt
-Pumpkin
-Sponge brush
-Disposable cups
-Paper plate (recommended)

Step 1. Pour some glue into a disposable cup and some Epsom salt in another cup. Dip your sponge brush into the glue and coat the pumpkin.

Step 2. Put a light coat of glue on the pumpkin – you don’t want to put too much on or else you will get runs and clumps.

Step 3. Sprinkle the Epsom salt over the areas that have wet glue. I did about a quarter of the pumpkin at a time. I was working on an old pizza pan (it is my portable work space) and wish I would have used a paper plate – it would have made clean up a lot easier – so you could make a funnel and pour all of the extra Epsom salt back in the container.

Step 4. Let it dry.  Hint: Try using some food coloring  to tint the Epsom salt orange or any color you desire.

 

Credit & Courtesy of: http://davisdaybyday.blogspot.com/

 

GHOST JUGS

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Stationed on a walkway or porch, these homemade lanterns will extend a ghostly greeting and good-bye to all your holiday visitors.

Materials
  • Clean plastic gallon milk jugs
  • Black permanent marker
  • Craft knife
  • String of 50 clear low-wattage holiday lights
Instructions
  1. Draw ghost eyes and mouths on the jugs. Tip: Leave the caps on while you do this, so the jugs don’t dent.

  2. Use the craft knife to cut a half-dollar-size hole in the back of each jug (a parent’s job).

  3. Arrange the ghosts near each other and string the lights between them, stuffing several bulbs into each of the jugs.

     

    Credit & Courtesy of: http://familyfun.go.com

BLACK CAT O’ LANTERNS

Found this Great DIY project online that you can easily make. Would look great on your front porch or sidewalk or even by a bush. This calls for a lit candle, but I would use a battery operated tea light.

http://www.sunset.com/home/weekend-projects/make-black-cat-o-lanterns-00400000011841/

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Credit for this project goes to Sheila Schmitz.

FRONT PORCH FALL DECORATING IDEA

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So Beautiful, so inviting.  It is just bursting with country charm.

An Idea gathered from www.bhg.com  Better Homes and Gardens website. 

Easy “How to”  for the look above:

Let the natural elements of a fall harvest inspire your front entry decorations for the season. Stuff the bottoms of vintage harvest baskets with newspaper and fill them with fresh apples. Attach dried cornstalks to porch posts with wire hidden under burlap, then use Indian corn, gourds, and vintage rakes and pitchforks to add to the harvest theme. Pots of red mums and red fall leaves add vibrant color, straw bales add layered height, and the front door wreath — a head of kale surrounded by faux apples, seedpods, and leaves secured with florist’s wire to a foam base — brings the natural look together.

BLACK CAT O’ LANTERNS

Found this Great DIY project online that you can easily make. Would look great on your front porch or sidewalk or even by a bush. This calls for a lit candle, but I would use a battery operated tea light.

http://www.sunset.com/home/weekend-projects/make-black-cat-o-lanterns-00400000011841/

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Credit for this project goes to Sheila Schmitz.